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Connecticut Author Will Explore Musical Revolution of the 1960s in Program at West Hartford Library

D.H. Robbins will give a multimedia presentation on ‘The Sixties: Revisiting a Crucial Decade’ at the Noah Webster Library in West Hartford on Thursday, May 17.

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Connecticut author D.H. Robbins will take a trip back to the 1960s in this multimedia presentation exploring the music revolution that changed the world. He will cover the roots of rock, the dance craze, the British Invasion, the San Francisco Sound, and the decade’s biggest concerts.

Robbins is a Baby Boomer who grew up in Darien and currently lives in Simsbury, where he writes fiction.

Robbins’ first published novel, “The Tu-tone DeSoto,” follows eight Iowa teenagers coming of age in the Kennedy Years (1960-1963). His second novel, “Chamelea,” was published in 2015.

A former publications art director/designer, Robbins is also an interactive media strategist who co-authored two design reference books: “Motion by Design” (2006) and “Visual Effects Artistry” (2009).

The presentation will be held in the Lower Level Meeting Room of the Noah Webster Library, 20 South Main St., West Hartford.

Parking in the nearby Isham Garage will be validated inside the library with a vehicle license plate number prior to the event. For more information, visit the event page on the library’s website, or call the library at 860-561-6990.

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